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Answers to your Questions

Further Playing Tips
& related ?'s

1) How do you play a didg?

2)How do you make that classic drone sound

3) How do you make that popping sound?

4)After playing continuously for
several minutes sometimes I find  I get a pool of saliva building up under my tongue.
I can't swallow without my drone stopping.
Whats the best way to avoid this?


5)
Overtones on the didg-
How do you make that toot note or overtone

How do you get rid of the gap between overtone and drone,  

6) How do I make rhythms on my didg ?, Bart

7) What is jawbreathing ?, Bart

8) How do you circular breath? for  Marcelo, Mik & Kerry

9) I know how to Circular breath, but it seems that even when I circular breathe I still  need to stop to breath. Is this usual? Is there a way to fill my lungs more or should I just breathe more often. I probably breath once every 5-10 seconds., Jasen


1) Accepting  our playing and becoming  more expressive.


2)Animal sounds....I can make reasonably good yelps and screams but I dont seem to be able to get heaps of volume and really high pitch which can sound sooo good. Am I going to be limited by my natural voice pitch or with practise will I be able to get higher and louder?

Also volume in general...if I try to use more pressure to increase volume, it works till I get to a point where it just wrecks the drone. How do you guys get such good volume? Some of the credit obviously goes to the didge shape, but technique does too ..right?


3) "Water improves  the playing  of the didg" Peter(USA)

4) May didgeridoo Playing cause adverse physiological effects? Are there known Occupational diseases for didg players? , Claudio

5) Most popular asked question is ~How to make animal sounds or  how to improve Vocal sounds??????????- Theres an answer above. Heres another one.

6)How can I strengthen  my rhythmic playing?

7)How do I  remember something I've played?



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1) Q-  How do you play a didg?

       A
-   The mechanics   of making the drone sound is to  blow a raspberry, done by flapping the lips   as a horse does , as you blow out, whilst sealing the  mouthpiece with your mouth and lips inside the top of the didg. Some people get it first go  , others get a note  closer to a trumpet sound which sounds  more like a farting sound. If you get this sound  have a laugh and dont be  ashamed to keep trying. Recall the   innocence of being childlike  and exploring sound  so you can give yourself the chance to explore the sounds possible until you hit on the  sweet drone   and overtone notes.

Ok so if your getting the farting sound, experiment with the contrast of tight   and loose lips. Even overtighten further as you blow  out,  you will notice the trumpet like overtone sound that the didg is capable of . This sound is  used  as a percussive  sound with the drone   as the background sound. Then overloosen your lips letting the air be expelled quicker through your lips  The  drone is the important one that is first base, so  , keep at it ,- take a breath in, blow out, sealing the mouthpiece end with your mouth inside, letting the lips loose so they start  bouncing up  and down against one  another giving of the drone sound. Trying can be a hurdle as  one    can overcompensate with tight lips, so keep coming back to loose  lips and not  trying to contain  or  focus the air  being expelled, even if the air is released very quick. It s the combination  of the lips being together yet loose that leads to the bouncing as the air is released , a vibrating drone. Once you've got the drone sound you will then be able to start varying the lip tightness and experimenting with sound variances without  loosing the drone note.

As your starting out with didg, enjoy and embrace the unknown element of learning to play. Each didg and each person is individual and theres no right  or wrong way to play or to learn as to steps or timing. In this way  didg is an explorative instrument that some folk even liken to a friend . if you enjoy the lement of playing  a natural instrument   and  relate to its connection to earth and spirit  ,it can be  a sacred journey. At the same time immensely fun.
Happy didgin

© 2000 Heartland Didgeridoos

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2) - Q - How  do you make that classic drone sound?

        A -
The abilty to vary drone pitch and sound   often comes over time  as your lips get better and better  at maintaining   a drone at a  tighter aperture. So  my suggestion is to keep experimenting and  see how tight you can develop your lips to vibrate without  losing the note. Also different didgs and different people  all add accentuations that vary the sound  so to  totally imitate another is often impossible.We all have  our  own individual sound.

Also in regard to the tight lipped drone, by moving your tongue close to your lips  and almost in between as they vibrate  often creates  the much  sort after, defined drone sound ( some call this a reed note with the tongue between the lips). Then varying from loose  to tight as you circular breath creates one of the simplest rythyms.

© 2000 Heartland Didgeridoos

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3)  - Q - How do you make that popping sound ?


A - Its made  with flat cheeks,a   slightly open mouth drone, in other words jaw as open as possible  and all of a sudden closing mouth to very tight drone cheeks still flat. This produces a popping or whacking sound. Try outside of didg to get a feel for it. The sound comes from the sudden compression  and release of air. Using contast between loose and tight lips  is  a feature to work  on in playing  and this is  the extreme transition.  Doing  it at half speed produces another slightly different effect,that isa common sound used in traditional playing styles-a punctuation after going from loose lips to tight with the drone note almost stopping  and then being kickstarted again,witha definable stop point. Both of these effects  put into a rhythm context sound great. 

© 2000 Heartland Didgeridoos

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4)After playing continuously for  several minutes sometimes I find
I get a pool of salive building up under my tongue. If it gets between my lips it sometimes causes my drone to stop.I can't swallow without my drone stopping. Whats the best way to avoid this?
Do I need to learn to circular swallow? :-) or just dribble
without stopping?   Dave


Great question Dave ,   a common   question   and obstacle  for didg players.
  Saliva is that essential ingrediant that gives lubrication to our lips and tongue and accentuation to our voice, so having too much is better than too little. But too much can also effect  the sound range whilst at the same time  stored inside the mouth the fluid alters the soundings somewhat and this can be used to an advantage. So theres positives and the negatives to saliva buildup.  Swallowing  can only be done if you stop for a split second.  This can only work in a  playing sequence,    if it suits  the playing style  as a piece. If it does  it can be  done  by  accentuating  the  break, which can be highlighted by  jumping back into the playing with a toot note (overtone) or any accentuated sounding.   Mark Atkins (professional aboriginal didg player) and I worked together at a festival where I was  selling didg and he was busking. I learnt a lot listening to his playing. He had a knack of using   complete breaks in  his playing  as accentuations, where he'd even add a  non drone based call to great effect. So this is definately one way to get around this problem.

The simplest way though is to let the river run rather than damming it up; in otherwords gradually or here and there spit it   throught the doning. We do this to a degree anyway  but sometimes if excess is building  its either store it  or let some flow. Theres  a knack to minimising  any gliches in the sound train as your  doing so. When I do this   I generally have an alteration  somewhat in the sound but at least the   drone keeps going and I dont have  a resevoir in my mouth.

And as to circular  swallowing let me know if  you perfect, it must be an enlightened didg players trick, for us mortals   circular dribbling  is the go. I hope this helps Dave,  happy didgin bro,   Tynon

© 2000 Heartland Didgeridoos

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5) Overtones on the didg  How do you make that toot note or overtone , Damian

The overtone  or toot  or horn note is  made   by tightening the lips  in a  more  trumpet like  way as opposed to the loose  lips bouncing  drone note. By also  putting the top lip slightly forward or pulling the bottom lip inward  it can also be likened to the   process of blowing  a flute. Similar but  tighter like a trumpet. Each didg has a sweet spot as to the degree of tigthness or openess  and each didg has   generally two or more overtones by further tightening or  reducing the   amount of  air released under pressure.
© 2000 Heartland Didgeridoos

How do you get rid of the gap between overtone and drone, Dave Seaton.
The process of changing between the drone note  where the lips  are  in alignment with each other and loose and the overtone where  much more pressure is   added  as the opening is reduced and the lips change position slightly ,   is  a challenge  as to getting the  change over smooth and integrated. This is one  playing process that is trial and error and no  amount of  teaching from another  generally helps. Knowing that pressure is needed in the overtone and keeping air  reserves and preparedness to slip  and loosen   the lips back into a drone    are the elements to keep  in mind. Apart from that just a good dose of persistance and  desire to get it   will be the  most helpfull.

© 2000 Heartland Didgeridoos

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6) How do I make rhythms on the didg ? , Bart

Rhythms on the didg are created  by a combination of breath timing, and sound or mouthing repitition. For example  if the timing of the outbreath equals the timing of the inbreath ( inbreath covering the  full squeeze cheek motion of the inbreath phase-not the  actual snatch timing), then you have a rhythm. If the outbreath is twice the inbreath phase   this is another rhythm. If theres two in breaths for every outbreath phase you have another rhythm. If you have two in for  an equal timed out followed by one in for equal timed out and then the whole two parts repeat over and  over , you have a more complicated rhythm. And it goes on and on, the possibiities are pretty endless. Then interspersing vocal sounds in  a timed pattern the rhythm is accentuated. or   certain wordings or mouthed phrasings can be used whether didgeridoo, didamore, didamulla, thuka too, ditty roo, walk a  doo, kirrawee, lilli pilli- make up your own.

With rhythms   simplicity is  helpfull and repitition is the foundation. Even the simplest rhythms  played over and over becomes enchanting when one  relaxs into it. Those listeneing will often get  more out of this than a complex  but formless playing style. Trying to incorporate too much  can be  a failing. I know of one class didg player that  stuck to one rhythm and  played it over and over and   explored  every way that one rhythm could be  strenghtened. He  is renowned for  his rhythmic playing style.

© 2000 Heartland Didgeridoos

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7) What is jawbreathing ?, Bart

Jawbreathing  is a more advanced style of circular breathing where you dont rely on the cheeks, as in puffing up and then flattening  as you snatch a breath. It is done with the cheeks totally flat at all times, also making the  stream of air very focused , and punchy.It then relys more on diaphramatic breathing because theres less time to get the breath in and it relys on more controlled use of muscles in the mouth  and jaw movement , with the diaphragm backing up with the strong snatch and keeping the pressure up.

It suits  a more rhythmic playing style with a lot of punchiness  which comes from the diaphragm and snatch pulse that forms a very strong beat. Oscillating between  jawbreathing and cheek breathing in a rhythmic way can also be an effective way to build a rhythym form that has   contrasting effects.

© 2000 Heartland Didgeridoos

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8) How do you circular breath? for  Marcelo, Mik & Kerry

Circular breathing is the simple and yes beleive it simple act of storing excess air in your cheek/mouth cavity and when grabbing a quick snatch of air with your nose,using  your cheeks and jaw to squeeze enough airpressure through your lips that the vibrating  lips continue doing their thing   long enough to get that bit of air.

I say simple   because the first thing  that will trip  you up learning is thinking its hard. Break it down into its simple componants. And practice simple steps that lead you towards it. And believe, that  its simple and that your going to get it . Persist, focus, enjoy, let go   and trust. It will come.

To know that you've got  what it takes, blow a balloon . Feel those cheek muscles, thats what your developing. Then fill the mouth with water  in the shower in the mornings and spit out at the same time as you snatch a breath. If you can do that you'll know you can do it. The rest is practice.

Next  look in the mirror while you play and  see if you can do a drone and pump your  cheeks in and out, in and out, over and over  until your out of breath. Have you control over what your cheeks do. Do they add pressure to the air stream as they flatten. Your aiming to be able to do it quick or slow  when and exactly as you want,  both  cheeks in unison   and always adding pressure to the airstream as they flaten. -to the point  you can  almost make a whacking sound as they flaten.

Next  try the quick snatch. Drone until a point , very quick snatch of air through the nose and dont worry if the drone stops, just get back into the drone, and do this over  and over until you hone that gap until its so minimal and your very quick at snatching.

Next we integrate the two above steps. This time no in  and out with the cheeks  unless  snatching a breath. So drone with cheeks fully puffed out, and pick a moment when your going to start flattening   cheeks and adding pressure to the airstream. At that split second snatch a breath, and if theres a gap dont worry  jump back into droning. Its  essential your snatching at the moment the cheeks begin flattening.  With practice your timing will get  better and the gap will start to be  less noticeable.

This is the  place though where many folk  trip them selves up.  And thats by focusing on the gap and thinking   they're not doing it right. A big  gap  at first, then a smaller gap , then a hardly noticeable gap, then only  differences in the sound that swirl in a circular motion  . At each point I've seen folk get hung up on  where they are on  that natural path to circular breathing. Getting hung up makes it worse. Trust the path, it may be  annoying  at times and leaves  one wondering -"Am I doing it right" But each step- it too shall pass.

Keep dancing between persistance ,focus   and letting go and trusting. That gap will get smaller and the   circular element will get stronger. Always go back to the mirror if stuck and check your timing and   how  much strength  there is  in the cheek movement.

If  you have  good cheek movement and your  timing is Ok and  your still having   trouble getting it   also try this. Have  your cheeks fully pufffed and instead   of big   flatening movements,  go for the quick snatch with little  subtle cheek flattening , aiming to keep, the pressure  up to the cheeks as if your blowing a balloon.

Most of all enjoy the process and know you'll get it. Either  make it a dailly ritual, or as an extreme give yourself   a concentrated period of focus in a day,or over some days,or weeks. I've seen many folk get it  in a day or days ,lots within  weeks and  heaps within  3 months.

If you want it to get it, you will ,knowing this  is as important  as the  knowing the  steps and the how tos.
,happy circular didgin8888888888888 Tynon

© 2000 Heartland Didgeridoos

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9) I know how to Circular breath, but it seems that even when I circular breathe I still   need to stop to breath. Is this usual? Is there a way to fill my lungs more or should I just breathe more often. I probably breath once every 5-10 seconds., Jasen

Most folk in the early stages of  circular breathing  tend  to predominantly have a slower style of playing that ties in with taking breaths every now and again.  Yes, theres more pressure on the snatchs  and more chance of running out of air. Breathing more regualrly should make a  big difference, whilst its a good challenge to also   work towards integrating  fast and slow styles of breathing and playing. The early on  phase  in our playing often highlighted by slower stretched out   drones and playing style  is a fantatic stage except we often want its to pass thinking it doesn't sound that good and yes  our circular may be  a struggle.

The more our playing  develops the more you may find that regular snatchs  of breath   becomes more the done thing , enforcing a more rhythmic style of playing. Even if   a long stretch of outbreath playing might be  then contrasted  with some short in and outs  to refill the lungs, and then repeating this pattern of long out breath with  perhaps 2,3 or  4 quicker in an out breaths, over and over. When we   only take breaths further apart, interestingly  theres more chance of   the remaining air in our lungs becoming stale. Complete exchange of  air is as important as taking in air.

Releasing air throught the nose   as well as droning on  is a common  practice in didg playing to release stale air . So this could be one reason your  running out of air. If you  can't  work out how to do this , dont worry, you might  even be doing it  and not realising ; or it will naturally come. One day I realised   I'd  been doing it  for  awhile without  knowing so.

Interestingly I find that it eventually becomes easy to rely on  short quicker breaths and then get lazy with  the style of breathing that your doing ,slow and spaced out, so honour   where you coming  from and with these suggestions  a new phase will open the way. Just dont throw out   how you play now this will  serve you well as well.

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1) Accepting  our playing and becoming  more expressive.

As John Lennon said " Life s what happens whilst were busy making other plans"

True for life and surely didg playing for, when do we arrive????
This would be one of the main gifts and challenges that I've found from didg playing. Just to be in the process however it is, letting go of judgments and expectations.

Blessing our playing as it is!

Have you ever been playing and noticed yourself overly concerned by how it sounds to someone else?

Ahh the critic again! Afriend and a foe!

I imagine our aura shrinks in and we open overly to others energy fields and any that match our feeling of being judged or not good enough.

I've found an expanding process whilst playing is helpfull,and it begins by showering acceptance on myself as I play ,then giving myself permission to totally let loose and feeling my aura expand with the sound untill I'm lost in the expression.
In fact I dont lose myself ,I find my centre.

Go For It!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

© 2000 Heartland Didgeridoos

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2) Animal sounds....I can make reasonably good yelps and screams but I dont seem to be able to get heaps of volume and really high pitch which can sound sooo good. Am I going to be limited by my natural voice pitch or with practise will I be able to get higher and louder?

Also volume in general...if I try to use more pressure to increase volume, it works till I get to a point where it just wrecks the drone. How do you guys get such good volume? Some of the credit obviously goes to the didge shape, but technique does too ..right?

As with overtones making vocal sounds takes added energy and stores of air so having  an awareness can help especially if you want to  put out an outpouring of vocal sounds, as in volume or a lot together or complicated  as to articulating . It is easier for the  drone note to drop out , so being  aware of this  builds an ability to work with both drone and vocals.

Each of us has  a different  access to sound based upon the pitch  and range of our voice so ultimately we will  each have our individual flare as to  vocal sounds, whilst I believe each of  has an ability to produce loud and effective vocals. 
The above suggestions
can be  a very helpfull way to expand ones vocal range.

 1) Accepting  our playing and becoming  more expressive.

Its our inhibitions that are most often our obstacle. Appreciate their gift , challenge their limits and step by step you'll see big improvments. Gentle calls  project  part way down the didg and give a far of sound feel,  whilst if you want a loud  sound  or cry , project it down the  didg, intend it to go out the other  end  not half way. Mean it  all the way. High tones or really low tones may take some experimentation but play   along and they'll come.

Most of all have fun exploring  vocal sounds , the more  one explores the more  one plays the more it becomes second nature. And watch for the judge within , give him a day of, have a laugh and play on.

© 2000 Heartland Didgeridoos

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3) "Water improves  the playing  of the didg", Peter(USA)

It is traditional practice culturally in Australia for  water to be poured down the didg before playing. Its primary purpose  is to help the sound travel along the glisteny surface created by the water. There is a noticeable difference in sound improvement. Also time on the didg warming it  up, adds to the improvement in sound transference.The water also cleanses the didg and  moistens the wood perhaps increasing its longevity. Some didgs are sealed on the inside with varnish or beeswax to create this effect on a permanant basis. If so  Its still recommended to flush with water at least, to cleanse the didg of   spit, dust and  insects who love to move in.
Also after a didg session  a water flush down the didg can feel a nice completion.

© 2000 Heartland Didgeridoos

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4) May didgeridoo Playing cause adverse physiological effects? Are there known Occupational diseases for didg players? , Claudio

Top question. What a challenge to answer it. here we go!

I know two Dr Didgs, one   a mate who is an actual doctor didg player healer. I'll ask him as well.

I am into didg healing work, so I'll dub myself Dr Didg No 3 and answer your question.

From experience most physiological effects are on the plus side, calming effects from breath control, internal   organ massage from diaphragm action, sound vibration healing effects, mental switch off from the   positive focus of a rhythmic healing vibratory  kind.

But heres the short list on the down sides.

Most are excistant with experienced players more so than  for players in the earlier or  more recreational styles of playing.

* Lip  problems

-  e.g- breaking a bloodvessel . Cause ~ inadequate warm up. Going from  slow droning to fast  high pressure  tight  lip  droning, way too quick with inadquate build up. Cure ~ Rest and  more warm up time . It should heal fine. I've had this  and   changing mouthpiece positioning from one side to playing in the middle or the other side   is one way to speed healing.
I f you experience  blowing up of the  lip as in expanding in size, this is   generally a  beginners concern and settles down, just ease into  it a bit   a day or a few times a day and this should very soon no longer  occur.

*Didg players sholder

- Holding a didg in one   arm and playing  every day for  quite long periods    can produce tighness and muscle and  tendon fatigue . I was talking  to Dr   Didg a couple of months back and two didg mates I knew where visiting him with didg   players sholder. Cure ~ get  a massage or visit a physio, and change or alternate which  arm  holds  the didg; and  buy or make a didg stand to support your didg while you play ( check www.heartdidg/didgstands.htm ) This releases the weight and tension of holding and  maximises the  healing   effects of playing perhaps  many fold.

* Hyperventilating   and Up- tempo playing stress

Hyperventilation  is   common  in learning  circular and is  either discomforting or   a nice high or spin out. its  simply resulting from not getting enough oxygen in and too much blowing out so remember to  take time to breath and keep grounded.

Up tempo playing stress, is similar , it comes from excessive fast, rhythmic playing where  short sharp quick breaths are taken regularly. There can be a tendency to  fall into lazyness with first not getting enough air in  and so  experiencing mild hyperventialtion, but also  prolonging this style of playing is very up and  is of  high energy on a nervous system level and if not balanced it may  be experienced as mildly stressfull. It also can be addictive, so if one finds themselves only playing fast styles with  resistance to  integrating slower styles you may have the symptoms of    'fast playing addiction' lets call it. Integrating fast and slow is very wholistic and  both have their  place and positive effect whilst with any polarity there  is either a potential  missed or a down side  that may eventuate from over emphasising.*

*Voice and throat concerns

Voice-Like  with singing  our voice can do well to be warmed up, so when doing calls and shrill sounds which are more radical on our voice   than tones  and droning like voice sounds, take time to warm the voice up and stretch gradually   until settled and ready to  go for it.

Thoat- The other factor is if  your didg has been sitting  idle it may have  quite a dust build up inside and  also may be moldy if in a damp environment. Your didg becomes an extension of your throat chamber and any dust etc in the didg will circulate into your lungs. Ask any didg maker  who often  picks up a didg after sanding    or making and forgets to blow through  it first. So rinsing  ones didg before  and or after playing is a good habit  if your concerned by this   or notice a dryness in your throat from didg playing. Didg playing does  use a lot of  saliva so  dry throat is not  only from dusty didgs  more so from playing a heap and maybe not drinking enough fluid in general, but a dusty didg doesn't help much.

* Playing other peoples didgs-

In this day and age    one may take two approaches. One to trust  explicitly and beleive one   has no thing  to fear and will not contract anything   from another persons didg. One part of me  relates to this. Anthiam and I  havn't immunised our children, out of our trust  and also our healthy diet and lifestyle, we trust in our  bodies immunity, so  I have one foot on that side of the fence.  On the other side from years of selling didg to folk; and festivals where I  and others would play didgs over and over, it is my experience that my body had to work overtime in fighting stuff I took on  and I'd often come home with  a cold. Was it  the environment of a festival, talking and giving too much, or sharing too many didgs. Well I reckon  a combination. These  days I still live with a foot on either side, trusting my  immunity and  also I dont make a  habit of playing  didgs that other have  played ,unless  I at least check theres no saliva and wipe   it clean . Ideally I wash didgs with a Teatree or Eucalyptus oil water mix which is a natural disenfectant. I'm not real good with follow through except with water and a rag but periodically adding something   and  doing so and rinsing the inside as well is a good disenfectant process.  Taking ones didg to the beach and dipping in   salt water is also a good cleansing   .

Some folk  have   a didg thats only for them and another didg there more open to sharing. Something to journey with!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I'd love to hear of any other factors or experiences others have had, and I'll add more to this  over time.

But seriosusly didg playing is so damn good for us,  you should see the length of the plus's I'm gathering   as part of a didg book to come. Makes the above down sides a speck.

So didg on in bliss of   the pitfalls mostly ; just  be in balance  and in   your centre and this will draw you on as is perfect for you.

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5) Most popular asked question is ~How to make animal sounds or  how to improve Vocal sounds??????????- Theres an answer above. Heres another one..

The strength of ones circular breathing plays  a big part. As long as you can easily circular breath as long as your lips can keep it up, then you can be assured you've got what it takes to produce  good vocal sounds. Producing vocal sounds does take added energy and thus air so there can be some  practice particularly with the louder sharper calls. As long as your not  about out of air though, an average resevoir  of air is fine to even produce the loudest vocals, but one gets used to perhaps taking in an extra snatch of air, or each rhythmic breath a deeper snatch.

Vocal sounds/Animal sounds are simply utilizing the range of sounds we use  in speach and expression. Being game in experimenting is the first helpful hint in widening your range. Try a sound outside of the didg, then in it. Letters, syllables, words, rolls  of the tongue or punctuations whilst  making sounds.  Being intentful not shy about making the sound is next step. Take the old bit of advice  fake it  until you make it with vocals. In otherwords, assume it sounds awesome for the listener for remember the listener is down the other end and they hear it better, so go for it.

And if you reckon the other player sounds better, remember , they probably think the same of your sounds and if your newer don't be frustrated if  you can't  make a sound they do for you'll come up with sounds later they can't or that they make differently. We all have a different voice tone, mouth cavity and we're all different. Find your own path with vocal sounds is  the best help I can offer.

As with animal sounds particularly, listen to the sounds of animals and nature and imitate with the didg. This is how the Kookaburra, dingo, owl,  and kangaroo sounds came to be. Sing your own song in celebration of nature.

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6)How can I strengthen  my rhythmic playing?

Whenever  having a didg blast, play for some time on one rhythm and hold it a lower speed for  some time and  then at a higher speed for  as long as you can until the cheeks and jaw really feel it, then back to  a lower speed again for some time.  Hold the rhythm and trance out. Its good practice, for it also disciplines us away from  rambling if this is a bad habit.

You can also use a technique that some advanced players use, to fast track their cheek, jaw strength. But beware, do so with caution, you can strain your muscles easily. No jokes. Get a  Balloon, blow it  only the tiniest bit so it actually has  air in it and pressure but not at that point its really starting to fill up. Then  do either, cheek in and out, over and over again pressuring against the balloon, or  cheeks flat and jaw up and down also pushing against the balloon, or tongue punctuations or wording patterns  against the pressure. Only do the smallest amount at first and then build up   a bit each day over time.

With rhythms   simplicity is  helpfull and repitition is the foundation. Even the simplest rhythms  played over and over becomes enchanting when one  relaxs into it. Those listening will often get  more out of this than a complex  but formless playing style. Trying to incorporate too much  can be  a failing. I know of one class didg player that  stuck to one rhythm and  played it over and over and   explored  every way that one rhythm could be  strenghtened. He  is renowned for  his rhythmic playing style.
 

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 7)How do I  remember something I've played?

Have a didg note book or mental notebook, and by yourself or with your  didg friends, create your own didg language.  Thatís how it works in traditional didg playing areas. Its no different than Tablo players who sing their drumming as well as play it. Use letters and syllables and a notation to remind yourself of  the wording and either the breathing pattern in general or specifically where you breath in the rhythm pattern.

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Copyright- Heartland Didgeridoos
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